Who Will Pay?
#music #performance / Project Lead Adan Lemus

photo credit: Nicole Romanoff

About the project

I’m going to make a song that addresses issues students around the country, including myself, face in regards to post-secondary education. In this song I will recant the growing frustration reflected by my generation towards the ever-growing costs of tuition, our learning institutions, the high amount of stress our current system places on students shoulders, and the growing divide between our generation and generations past both financially and ideologically.

Intended impact and outcome of the Project

Music is a language almost all can understand, when imbued with the correct message, a song can become an anthem, a war cry, a prayer. Music is something I love to create, it defines and frees me, it allows me to communicate what I am feeling through the ephemeral while speaking directly to the audience. I intend to make a catchy song with an important message so people will want to listen to what needs to be said. If done right, and with advertisement, the product has the potential to be broadcast around the country, inspiring others to stand up for what they believe is right.

Artist Profiles

My name is Adan Lemus and I am currently an Interaction Design student at Emily Carr. In high school, I took a semester long intensive course in film making and became enamored with the idea of do it yourself art. In the following years I would win 2 film festivals, volunteer as a camera operator for an hour long television program that showcased music for four years, all the while starting and playing in my own band. I came to ECU originally for the Film program but quickly fell in love with painting and switched majors to Visual Arts. After much deliberation, I took a two year hiatus from education to return to Saskatchewan and invest my time wholly into my music; In those two years, my band, ACRONYMS, would receive a $5000 writing grant from the Saskatchewan Arts Board, go on two cross Canada tours, record two EP’s, play music festivals, receive high praise from the award-winning Dallas Green of City and Colour, and share the stage with acts such as Wide Mouth Mason, BadBadNotGood, We Are The City, Plants and Animals, and JPNSGRLS to name a few. During the latter half of the second year in Saskatchewan, I worked as a Visual Artist full time before deciding to return to Emily Carr University this past fall.

Tyson Goodyear is an award-winning session drummer and film maker, he co produced our award winning short film and has participated in almost all of my musical endeavours, including ACRONYMS. He has played drums for almost 20 years and is an avid photographer and cinematographer. He currently works as an electrician in Surrey.

Instagram: @adanlemus
Bandcamp: https://acronymssound.bandcamp.com/

My Education Story

I am a first generation Canadian. Both of my parents fled from El Salvador in the late 1980’s to avoid a bloody civil war, not coming out unscathed, they gathered themselves as best they could and worked tirelessly at whatever job they could get, all the while teaching themselves the English language. Only wanting what’s best for their children, they spent their income on paying the bills and feeding us. I got my first job when I was 13 and have worked hard since that day. Having no money saved for me and my education, any investment in my future has come directly from my pocket or has been loaned by the government. I am now in debt. As grateful as I am for the money that has been lent to me, I am fearful and uncertain of the day that debt must be repaid. As each year passes, tuition increases alongside the cost of living and I am met with the choice to either work and slowly pull myself out of the hole I am now in, or dig further down in hopes of a brighter day. I question, almost everyday, whether the choice I made to further my education was the right one or if I made a deal with the devil. I now feel cautious and uncertain to try new academic pursuits and have a growing sense of urgency as I slowly get older to make a concrete decision as to who I am. This is not how I work. When I am in school, I feel illuminated by all that is around me, I become a better version of myself and am excited to learn but the thought of this freedom coming at the cost of crippling debt that may effect me for the rest of my life is terrifying. It seems I cannot grow academically without becoming massively indebted to entities who lack faces or feelings, to institutions that see me as a number and not an individual, and I cannot leave this cycle without fully immersing myself or withdrawing completely. This is what the future looks like to many unless there is change.

Dear Premier…

I am a first generation Canadian. Both of my parents fled from El Salvador in the late 1980’s to avoid a bloody civil war, not coming out unscathed, they gathered themselves as best they could and worked tirelessly at whatever job they could get, all the while teaching themselves the English language. Only wanting what’s best for their children, they spent their income on paying the bills and feeding us. I got my first job when I was 13 and have worked hard since that day. Having no money saved for me and my education, any investment in my future has come directly from my pocket or has been loaned by the government. I am now in debt. As grateful as I am for the money that has been lent to me, I am fearful and uncertain of the day that debt must be repaid. As each year passes, tuition increases alongside the cost of living and I am met with the choice to either work and slowly pull myself out of the hole I am now in, or dig further down in hopes of a brighter day. I question, almost everyday, whether the choice I made to further my education was the right one or if I made a deal with the devil. I now feel cautious and uncertain to try new academic pursuits and have a growing sense of urgency as I slowly get older to make a concrete decision as to who I am. This is not how I work. When I am in school, I feel illuminated by all that is around me, I become a better version of myself and am excited to learn but the thought of this freedom coming at the cost of crippling debt that may effect me for the rest of my life is terrifying. It seems I cannot grow academically without becoming massively indebted to entities who lack faces or feelings, to institutions that see me as a number and not an individual, and I cannot leave this cycle without fully immersing myself or withdrawing completely. This is what the future looks like to many unless there is change.

 


LEAVE A REPLY

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

RELATED PROJECTS

Trapped

Yuriy Kyrzov, Bri Kim, Jingjing Wang


Loading